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Black Soldier Fly Larvae in Aquaculture: Sparing Pelagic Fish


bsfl aquaculture

Black soldier fly larvae represent a sustainable opportunity to complement the diet of aquatic species


A recent study sheds light on an insect solution to the growing demand for pelagic fish in aquaculture production.


Conducted by the Department of Agricultural Sciences at Texas State University, the study reveals promising findings that could revolutionize the insect feed industry.


live bsfl

The study suggests that 40,843 MT of pelagic fish could be avoided from ocean catch by using BSFL


The research found that by integrating black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens) larvae (BSFL) into the diets of aquaculture species such as Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar), Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and Whiteleg Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei), significant quantities of pelagic fish could be spared from ocean catch.


The study showed that at the highest level of dietary replacement of fishmeal and/or fish oil by BSFL, 40,843 MT of pelagic fish could be avoided from ocean catch.


Consequences of pelagic fish decline


The demand for pelagic fish, primarily sourced from ocean catch, has surged with the growth of the aquaculture industry.


pelagic fish swimming

Declining pelagic fish populations contribute to climate change by reducing their ability to sequester carbon dioxide from the atmosphere


Currently, a substantial portion of fishmeal and fish oil used in aquaculture comes from catching pelagic fish in the ocean, leading to environmental degradation and economic strain.


Moreover, the carbon footprint associated with using fishmeal and fish oil is significantly higher compared to dried BSFL, further exacerbating environmental concerns.


Additionally, declining pelagic fish populations contribute to climate change by reducing their ability to sequester carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.


The role of black soldier fly in sustainable aquaculture


The BSFL is a promising alternative that offers a multifaceted solution to these pressing issues.


black soldier fly larvae decomposing fruit

BSFL Technology offers revaluation services for organic waste of low commercial value


BSFL possesses the ability to convert organic waste into biomass, reducing the need for natural resource inputs and contributing to waste valorization.


Moreover, previous research indicates that BSFL can replace fish meal and/or fish oil in aquaculture diets without compromising growth or efficiency.


By integrating BSFL into aquaculture diets, the study suggests a path towards sustainability in aquaculture production.


Not only does this approach spare pelagic fish from ocean catch, but it also addresses environmental, economic, and social challenges associated with conventional feeds.


BSFL could significantly reduce the demand for pelagic fish


The integration of black soldier fly larvae in aquaculture represents a promising step towards a more sustainable future.


aquaculture installation

In order to guarantee sustainability in aquaculture, the integration of BSFL ingredients represents a potential alternative


With further research and implementation, BSFL could significantly reduce the demand for pelagic fish, mitigate environmental impacts, and foster economic resilience within the aquaculture industry.


Innovative solutions with BSFL continue to drive positive change in the global food system.



 

🪰 Curious about using insects in aquaculture?




Reference


Moore, E., Liu, X. and Drewery, M. L. (2024). Pelagic fish spared from ocean catch by integrating Black Soldier Fly Larvae in U.S. aquaculture production. Front. Sustain. Food Syst., 8:1297414. doi: 10.3389/fsufs.2024.1297414

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